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Le Bands

Tonight I'll be doing a lot of dead-boring philosophy homework, but tomorrow I'm off to 'Battle of the Bands' at the Preston Town Hall to watch Em's band 'The Indifferent' compete. You are invited (if you are young and hip).

3

Viv shut her eyes for a moment and opened them. She was able to see more easily in the gloom, and bent down against the wall. Something smelt disgusting, and a wave of nausea came and went. She ran a shaking hand through stringy blonde hair and grabbed the protruding edges of the brick with her fingers, laboriously dragging it out and onto the ground with a thud. She gathered up her stash and shoved it in her coat pocket and wiped the sweat from her cheeks and wanted to slide the brick back into place but didn’t have the strength or coherency of thought to do so.

The bus had broken down about half-way. It was shuddering at all the stops and eventually it gave out and the bus driver assured everyone that there would be a replacement along in a few minutes but it took about twenty and by that time she knew she should have jumped off because that tugging and niggling feeling was getting really bad and making her shake and sweat but she’d been through worse and she wasn’t going to give in, she was going to the river.

There was a perfect place there that was just hers, for Viv’s use only, because she was the only one who used it and maybe the only one who knew about it. It was high up and secluded with a view of the water covered in light like an oil-spill and all the crowded buildings mourned the loss of it. It was the hotel that made it perfect; tall and bathed in golden light all over, every window was always lit up from within, as if there were some perpetual celebration taking place at all hours of the day and night. It was the place of the rich and famous, and she’d picked up brochures with pictures of the rooms that looked too good and too expensive to be true. It was a monument to the good life, the best life, and the focal point of all her dreams. She imagined herself dressed in finery, with make-up and jewels and white arms sitting sprawled along a sun-bathing chair with a glass of the most expensive wine looking out over the city lights and being twenty-stories up in the heavens instead of down there. She was there alone as a movie-star or the wife of a man in a sharp suit, it didn’t matter. She was there.

In reality, Viv was moving past a train-station and her teeth were jittering and the heroin in her pocket was getting heavier and more substantial and she couldn’t stop thinking about it. She knew her luck was gone when she stopped putting forward internal reasons not to hit up now and began to think of reasons why she should. There will always be other times. There will always be more. There’s nobody around. You can’t last long enough. It’s not worth it to wait. Then she was sitting against yellow tiles and setting up and the stuff was in, in, in, and then the light went out.

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